Soundview Executive Book Summaries


How Much is Too Much?

Here’s a topic that should spark some debate: Is there such a thing as too much personal disclosure in the realm of the Internet?

Apparently, someone thinks so. However, his identity may surprise you. Check out this quote:

“I don’t believe society understands what happens when everything is available, knowable and recorded by everyone all the time… I mean we really have to think about these things as a society.”

This same person went on to suggest that the youngest members of society may one day seek to change their names because they’ve left a trail of embarrassing personal moments scattered across the Internet. The fact that a quick search can produce volumes of data about the average young person means that potential employers may have a filtered perception of just who they are considering for a position.

So, who is the mystery man who thinks there may be too much personal info online? Believe it or not, it’s Eric Schmidt … the CEO of Google!

Here’s the article from BBC.com where we were able to source the above comments. As the article indicates, there are those who believe that Schmidt is overstating the problem of willing disclosure of private information. However, the point about potential employers viewing candidates’ social networking sites is one that is discussed from time to time in books we review at Soundview.

Part of the problem is that the lack of filter creates a constant stream of communication with very little emphasis on connection. Soundview currently has a new summary from John Maxwell that attempts to respond to this issue in the physical world (although some of its concepts could easily be applied online). Visit us at Summary.com to learn more about Maxwell’s new book Everyone Communicates, Few Connect: What the Most Effective People Do Differently.

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