Soundview Executive Book Summaries


Employee Loyalty Equals Customer Loyalty

In a previous job, I worked for a woman who cared deeply about her employees. We enjoyed having every day off that both the post office and bank had, plus we always had the week between Christmas and New Years along with a Christmas bonus, on top of our regular vacation days. If your child had an event going on at school during work hours, she would encourage you to attend, and she was always interested in how our families were doing.

Her supportiveness resulted in a very loyal group of employees, ready to do whatever was needed to make the company successful. And this was especially evident in our treatment of our customers. We would go out of our way for them, because this was part of the overall atmosphere of the company.

Although this is certainly not a novel idea, loyalty seems to have taken a back seat to survival in the past decade here in the U.S.. While there has been a strong push for customer service, the employees have not always been taken into account.

In The Loyalty Factor, Dianne Durkin connects these two groups back together. Her Loyalty Factor is “Employee loyalty drives customer loyalty, which drives brand loyalty.” Some of her suggestions as to how to encourage employee loyalty include:

  • Communicate uniquely with each generation
  • Accommodate employee differences
  • Create workplace choices
  • Be flexible in your leadership style
  • Respect competence and initiative
  • Recognize achievements
  • Reward results

If you would like to hear more about Durkin’s thoughts on loyalty, you’re in luck. We’ve invited her to join us for our next Soundview Live webinar, Building Employee, Customer and Brand Loyalty, on May 15th. Register today and bring your loyalty questions to ask during the session.



How to Amaze Your Customers

A quick review of books on customer service shows that the prevailing view is to WOW customers, to knock their socks off with service far beyond what they expect. But Shep Hyken takes a different approach. He says that what will really amaze customers is if you provide consistently above average service – with the emphasis on “consistent.”

“Amazement is not necessarily about “Wow!” levels of service, although sometimes it may be. It is about an all-of-the-time, I-know-I-can-count-on-it, better-than-average experience.”

In Amazement Revolution, Hyken provides seven amazement strategies that companies can implement in order to provide that consistency, which I will list below. But he begins with one very important principle. You have to take care of your employees first!

“To keep external customers happy, you must make sure your employees know that you care about doing what’s right by them, day after day after day. Your employees will in turn care about doing what’s right by the customer.” “Amaze your employees, and they’ll spread the amazement!”

The 7 Amazement Strategies:

  1. Provide Membership – Shift your mindset to treat the people you serve more like members rather than customers.
  2. Have Serious Fun – Real FUN in the workplace is determined, not by how many belly laughs your enterprise generates, but by the level of fulfillment it generates in the workforce, the uniqueness it respects in each employee, and the sense of anticipation it creates for the next challenge on the horizon.
  3. Cultivate Partnerships – Deliver a premium level of service that incorporates active problem-solving and inspires customers to count on and return to your organization.
  4. Hire Right – Create and implement innovative hiring and retention processes that support your service mission.
  5. Create a Memorable After-Experience – A positive initial customer experience is only the beginning! Make sure your organization gives people the flexibility to deliver a range of powerful, personalized after-experiences.
  6. Build Community – Support and inspire both the internal and the external community of evangelists.
  7. Walk the Walk – Acknowledge, model, and reward adherence to customer-focused values at all levels of the organization.

Does your customer service experience need tweaking, or a complete overhaul? Then you’ll want to hear directly from Shep Hyken as he explains his strategies in detail, and provides case studies from best-in-class companies. Join us on March 8th for our Soundview Live webinar Learn the 7 Customer Amazement Strategies, and bring your questions for Shep.

You can fill your conference room with people to listen in, Free for subscribers and just $59 for all other registrants. You might consider using this as a customer service training session.



Have You Experienced Zappos?

As most business people and consumers are aware, Zappos is a shoe and apparel website with a reputation for superior customer service. It was started in 1999 as shoesite.com and after a hefty investment by Tony Hsieh became zappos.com. In 2009 the company was sold to Amazon for $1.2 billion, just 10 year after it began.

But what some people may not know is that Zappos’ commitment to customer service goes beyond its own doors. They have developed a program called Zappos Insightsto help other companies also excel at customer service. Although the company may seem like a wacky one-time success, this success is built on a set of principles that can be applied to any company.

Joseph Michelli, in his book The Zappos Experience, provides us with these principles from his research of the Zappos business, with ample cooperation from its employees and CEO Tony Hsieh. Here are the five Zappos principles:

  1. Serve a perfect fit – Zappos has a rigorous application process to make sure new employees fit with their culture, and let’s all unsuccessful applicants know why they weren’t accepted.
  2. Make it effortlessly swift – Customers are less concerned about WOW service then they are about getting satisfaction without a lot of effort.
  3. Step into the personal – Zappos finds ways to create individualized experiences that extend beyond their solid service platform.
  4. Stretch – Zappos understands that a key to retaining great people is to keep them challenged and learning.
  5. Play to win – High levels of workplace fun are consistently associated with increased creativity and productivity.

If you would like to hear more about these five principles and how they can be applied to your company, join us on February 16th for our Soundview Live webinar The Zappos Experiencewith Joseph Michelli. You’re sure to learn something that can help your business succeed, and perhaps have some fun in the process.



Trends in Customer Service

As social media has taken hold in all areas of business, and as the mobile device has become our primary vehicle of communication and interaction with companies, this phenomenon has brought with it a resurging emphasis on customer service.

The reasons are obvious. Now when I’m not happy with a company’s service, I have more options than calling them or filling out a survey. I can now post my complaint on Facebook to all my friends, Tweet about it to my followers, and even put together a video for Youtube. Viral complaints are the new catastrophe looming over company executives. Just ask United Airlines.

So it’s no surprise that business authors have caught on to this trend and are highlighting those companies that do customer service right. Here are just a few recent titles:

Among the lessons that companies are learning is that they must keep their finger on the pulse of social media. Someone needs to constantly monitor the major social media networks for mentions of their respective company and products. In this way catastrophes can be averted by a quick response to any issue that arises. Ford, PepsiCo and Southwest Airlines are among those companies with staff dedicated to monitoring social sites and handling issues as they come up.

Do you have stories about companies that have handled (or mishandled) customer issues aired through social media? If so, we’d love to post your stories with this blog. Please comment below.



Book Trends Part II

Leadership and communication are trends that have been and will continue to be with us, but some business book trends come and go with the hot topics of the business world.

Not too surprisingly, social media is one of those hot topics that are currently generating new books. Everyone wants to know how to make money with Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. Coupled with this subject is that of customer empowerment, that through the use of social media the customer has taken the reins and is telling companies what they want.

Chris Brogan is among the authors filling the need for information in the social media arena, with Trust Agents which he wrote with Julien Smith last year, and Google+ for Business coming out in November. Shel Israel and Robert Scoble discuss blogs in Naked Conversations, Adam Penenberg demonstrates the power of viral media in Viral Loop, and Robert Bloom explains the new power of the customer in The New Experts.

In tandem with the green movement, we’re also seeing an emphasis on corporate and personal responsibility. Customers are making product, service and investment decisions based in part on how good a “corporate citizen” a company is, rather than just on how good the products are.

Carol Sanford just released a book entitled The Responsible Business, about which we’re hosting a webinar tomorrow. Daniel Goleman recently shifted from emotional intelligence to Ecological Intelligence.  Joel Kurtzman emphasizes having a Common Purpose that looks beyond the bottom-line. And Tim Sanders discusses the responsibility revolution moving through corporate American in Saving the World at Work.

One more trend that needs a mention is innovation. Although this topic isn’t new, there has been a strong emphasis in the business book world on recreating companies to be innovation powerhouses. Clayton Christensen is a leader in this arena, with the concepts he introduced in The Innovator’s Solution, and then is applying to other fields like healthcare, with The Innovator’s Prescription. Josh Linkner explains how to empower employees to be creative in Disciplined Dreaming, and Norihiko Shimizu describes the continuous innovation practices of Toyota in Extreme Toyota.

One great thing about these prolific business authors is that they are ready to fill in the information gap when a new trend comes up on the horizon. Our challenge as businesspeople is to find the time to read and apply this information before the next sweeping change takes place. That’s why Soundview is in business – to cut down the time from book to application.



Delivering Extraordinary Customer Experiences

I expect that most of us remember a time not too long ago when the latest customer service mantra was “Underpromise and Overdeliver.” This concept made sense to a point. If you promise a customer that his shipment will arrive in 5 to 7 days, and he receives it in 3, he’ll be delighted. However, human nature being what it is, the customer will then begin to ignore your promise and expect delivery in 3 days every time. Advantage gone.

Rick Barrera advocates for a different approach to customers which he calls “Overpromise and Overdeliver.” Top companies like Apple, Pottery Barn, American Girl and Zipcar overpromise to lure customers in, and then overdeliver to keep them.

Barrera explains how aligning three types of customer contacts – Product TouchPoints, System TouchPoints and Human TouchPoints – can create dramatic market differentiation. Here’s an example:

TouchPoint #1: Product – Your espresso maker will do the job it’s designed to do without having to resort to flipping through manuals, changing brew settings, grinding beans and measuring and tamping. You offer prepackaged coffee pods that you just pop into the maker, and steaming espresso flows into the cup.

TouchPoint #2: System – In order for this espresso maker to keep its value to the customer, you must have a system in place to get them new coffee pods quickly and easily, by phone and the internet. The first time a coffee order is late, the machine may get packed away in the basement.

TouchPoint #3: Human – Customers also need to know that they can call and talk to a person about their order or about the machine. You need to have people in place who are knowledgeable about the customer, their order history, and especially the espresso machine itself.

Perhaps you’re trying to find a way to differentiate your product or service from your competition. Why not join us on September 15th when Rick Barrera will speak at our Soundview Live webinar How to Deliver Extraordinary Customer Experiences. Bring your questions for Rick as well. We’ll be providing attendees with a free copy of the Soundview summary of Overpromise and Overdeliver.

In a crowded business environment in which everyone seems to be shouting the same message at peak volume, overpromising and overdelivering is the best way to stand out.



Enchanted to Meet You . . .

Enchantment. When I hear this word, I can’t help but think of fairly tales and Disney movies. In fact, Disney actually has a movie entitled Enchanted. So what does enchantment have to do with business? It just happens to be the title of the latest business book from Guy Kawasaki.

Kawasaki is known for pushing the envelope, with books like Reality Check and How to Drive Your Competition Crazy, and with a following on Twitter of 398,722 (as of today). Kawasaki is the co-founder of Alltop.com which he calls an “online magazine rack” of popular topics on the web, and is a founding partner at Garage Technology Ventures. Also, not surprisingly, he was previously the chief evangelist of Apple.

In Enchantment, Kawasaki argues that in business and personal interactions, your goal is not merely to get what you want, but to bring about voluntary, enduring and delightful change in other people. The book explains all the tactics you need to prepare and launch an enchantment campaign; to get the most from both push and pull technologies; and to enchant your customers, your employees and even your boss.

If this is an enchanting idea to you, then please join Soundview and Guy Kawasaki on September 8th for our latest Soundview Live webinar, How to Change Hearts, Minds and Actions. Hopefully you’ll come away enchanted with the idea of launching your own Enchantment campaign. OK, I know I’m over doing the whole “enchantment” thing, but we’d love to have you join us, and to bring your questions for Guy.

You’ll receive our summary of Guy’s book with your registration, or you can purchase the summary here if you’re not sure you can make it to the webinar.



A FREE Resource You HAVE to Use!

There’s a reason I tend to conclude my posts by telling everyone to visit Soundview’s Web site, Summary.com. The site is regularly updated with information about newly released executive book summaries, book reviews (1,000 FREE reviews and growing!), upcoming Soundview Live Webinars and other great business learning resources.

I’ve got great news about another new resource available at Summary.com. How much do you think it would cost to attend an event where you hear vital business lectures from speakers such as Bill George, Patrick Lencioni, Jeffrey D. Sachs, Paul Krugman and David M. Rubenstein, among others? The event is the World Business Forum, and a ticket can cost as much as $2,500.

Fortunately, Soundview has partnered with HSM Global, producers of the World Business Forum, to bring you exclusive audio summaries of the event’s major speakers. These audio summaries are available for you to listen to for FREE!

Each audio summary is a 10-minute MP3 that features a narrated overview of the speech. The summary includes actual clips from the live speech given by the presenter at World Business Forum. If these tough economic times meant that you weren’t able to spend $2,500 on a ticket to the World Business Forum, these FREE audio summaries allow you to hear what you missed.

I need to stress here that you do NOT have to be a Soundview subscriber to listen to the World Business Forum audio summaries. These exclusive content pieces are FREE for everyone to learn from and enjoy. In fact, I’d recommend starting with Patrick Lencioni, whose latest book Getting Naked: A Business Fable About Shedding the Three Fears that Sabotage Client Loyalty is now available as a Soundview summary!

To listen to the audio summaries from the World Business Forum, CLICK THIS LINK!



Prepare for the Naked Truth

What would happen if you told your best clients the truth … about their operation, about your own company’s mistakes, about your company’s strengths and weaknesses?

Have you ever wondered why your organization feels the need to appear perfect to its clients but accepts it when the client makes a mistake or causes frustration?

This Friday, our next installment of Soundview Live will delve into these questions and much more. Join us on Friday, April 23 at Noon (Eastern) when Soundview presents New York Times best-selling author Patrick Lencioni. Patrick’s presentation Overcoming the Fears that Sabotage Client Loyalty serves as a preview to Soundview’s upcoming summary of Lencioni’s latest book Getting Naked: A Business Fable About Shedding the Three Fears that Sabotage Client Loyalty.

Lencioni will provide attendees with insights into the fears that cause our attempts to retain clients to backfire. I’ve listened to some of the preview materials and I can say that Lencioni isn’t kidding when he says the principles of naked service will make many people uncomfortable. However, he points out that this discomfort forces us to stay in a safe place, and safe places mean a complete lack of progress.

Tune in and let Patrick Lencioni and Soundview Live help your organization shed its fears. And remember, subscribers attend FREE!!



Unbecoming Attractions

I couldn’t tell you the last time I set foot in a movie theater. I won’t voice the usual grievance of previous generations and toss out details about the cost of a single ticket during my youth (although, ahem, the cashier generally saw a couple of images of Washington rather than Alexander Hamilton’s portrait, if you understand my meaning). To be honest, I don’t go because I simply can’t take the incessant ringing of cell phones despite multiple requests to silence them before the film begins.

However, I would certainly hesitate to complain about such a problem if I lived in St. Croix Falls, Wis. A theater patron in the town wrote a humble e-mail to the theater to voice her displeasure that she could not use a credit or debit card to purchase tickets for a showing of Shutter Island. It seems to me that the majority of Americans walk around with mostly plastic and very little paper in their wallets these days. Her complaint sounds reasonable enough, doesn’t it?

What this theater-goer received in return was a profanity laced tirade from the company’s vice president. Anyone who works in an organization that receives customer complaint e-mails has probably wanted to do exactly what the VP of Evergreen Entertainment did in this situation. Twenty years ago before e-mail and social media dominated every second of our lives, the woman’s complaint would have been in the form a letter that would have found its way to the trash. At most, she would have told her story to a dozen friends and the theater may have lost a few patrons.

That was then. I’m certain you can guess exactly what the aggrieved patron did next. You can click here and see for yourself.

In our new summary of Chris Brogan and Julien Smith’s Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation and Earn Trust, the authors repeatedly emphasize the need for companies to be more human toward their online customers. While yelling at one another is certainly a human action, it’s probably not what Brogan and Smith had in mind. In fact, this situation is a perfect example of how trust gets broken online. It also demonstrates the exponential power of one poor customer service interaction. The actions of Evergreen’s VP toward one customer now have 4,300 people lining up online to take their own shots at the company. You can only imagine how much the VP wishes he’d never hit “Send” on his rage-fueled e-mail.

As for the theater-goer, maybe she should take a page from my book and wait for Shutter Island to be released on Blu-Ray.